Low-melting Alloys

The Rose’s alloy (Bi, Sn and Pb), melts at 94 °C. The pure Bi has few technical applications (in instruments for magnetic measures), but is widely used in the form of salt (pharmaceutical products, cosmetic, enamel), and in metallurgy together with other metals. Alloyed Pb, Sn, Cd, Sb, the Bi alloys  have a melting point which is generally lower the 100 °C. These alloys have an high specific weight,  are very fluid, they don’t shrink after solidification and have a lower coefficient of expansion. They are used in welding, for form preparation, for impressions, for matrix, for the construction of safety valves, for the production of founts, and quenching bath. As well as the Rose’s alloy, are to mention: the Newton’s alloy (Bi, Pb, Sn), with melting point at 94,5 °C; The Wood’s alloy (Bi, Pb, Sn, Cd), with melting point at 65,5 °C; The Lipowitz’s alloy (as the previous but with different contents), with melting point at 60 °C. The alloy  Bi (50%), Pb (27%), Sn (13%), Ca (10%) is used for the production of punches and matrix for the cut and pressing of the sheets.

Lipowitz’s alloy   - melting point 70 °
Bi 50 %,
Pb 27 %
Sn 13 %
Cd 10 %

Wood’s alloy – melting point 70 °
Bi 49,5 %
Pb 27,2 %
Sn 13,2%
Cd 10,1 %

Wood’s alloy – melting point 71°
Bi 49.5%
Pb 27.3%
Sn 13.1 %
Cd 10.1 %
Rose’s alloy - melting point 96°
Bi 50% Pb 31.2% Sn 18.8 %

Arcet’s alloy  - melting point 96 °
Pb 32 %
Sn 15,5%
Bi 52,5 %

Arcet’s alloy – melting point 96 °
Pb 32,2 %
Sn 18,4 %
Bi 49,2 %